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Resource Category: Jewish Holidays

Sukkot is known in traditional rabbinic sources as a holiday of joy and gratitude, but what does this holiday look like for someone who can't feel that joy, either because of a chronic condition of a momentary challenge? How can we make our Sukkot places for sharing and love between people?
How does the Sukkah represent an ideal for safety, support, and love? And, how can we bring those lessons into our own lives and make Sukkot-Spaces of peace and safety?
Make Your Own Mental Health Lulav and Esrog! Sukkot, the Jewish harvest holiday of the “huts,” is a week of celebration that starts five days after Yom Kippur. Rabbinic tradition tells us a Sukkah, or temporary structure with at least three sides and a roof of thatch or branches, represents the dwellings the Israelites built  and lived in during their 40 years of wandering in the desert.
Death is a natural occurrence, and it is a normal reaction to feel overwhelmed and confused when a loved one dies. This Guide for the Grieving is a resource for: reviewing descriptions of traditional Jewish ritual and mourning practices, navigating practical decisions and understanding the range of physical, mental, behavioral, and emotional responses one may experience following the death of a loved one.
Yom HaShoah, or Holocaust Remembrance Day, is an important and powerful day. It serves as a reminder of what we have lost and what we must never allow to happen again. But it should also serve as a reminder of those who are still affected by the traumas of the Holocaust like those suffering from intergenerational trauma...
We are going to know a new freedom” -Alcoholics Anonymous, p. 83. I have always marveled at the paradox that our nation’s liberation from the bondage of slavery is marked by the quintessential period of restriction. A holiday that requires us to adhere to strict guidelines and detailed instructions with such profound exactitude and measure. To distance ourselves from something that in the rest of the year we get to engage in unconditionally. This is freedom? In working firsthand with individuals in addiction treatment as they battle for ultimate freedom, I now understand that the answer to this question is a resounding yes.