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Resource Library

Explore the connections between Judaism and mental health with our educational resources! Below you will find articles, downloadable activity sheets, videos and podcasts, and more about Jewish holidays and concepts, and the ways Judaism addresses mental illness.

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By Jaime Glazerman | The Torah compares the human body to a tree and writes that "For man is a tree of the field” (Deuteronomy 20:19). Just like we love and appreciate trees of all shapes and sizes, we must learn to love and appreciate our own unique "trees".
The month of February is set aside as Eating Disorders and Body Image Awareness Month. It is a time when we call attention to people who are struggling with all kinds of eating and body image-related challenges and a time to celebrate people of all shapes and forms. Tu B’Shvat and body positivity are surprisingly related within Jewish tradition.
For JDAIM and beyond, learn about kavod habriyut - the value of unqualified universal respect applies to all human beings, whether young or old, sick or healthy, tzadik (righteous person) or rasha (criminal), independent of social status, identity or context. Related to that idea is the Jewish value — and our mental health value — of all human beings being created in the image of God, b'tzelem Elohim.
Hanukkah occurs at the darkest point of the year. The seasons are changing, the air is cold, the days are short and the nights are long. These are times when we need light most, and that is why we are tasked with bringing that hope in the form of light into our homes. Bring some light into your home with our new Hanukkah guided meditation.
Natal - NATAL - Israel Trauma and Resiliency Center (established: 1998, Tel Aviv) is a non-profit organization founded by Yossi Hadar and Judith Yovel Recanati. NATAL specializes in the field of war-and-terror-related trauma, PTSD and resiliency-building among civil society. NATAL was the first center in Israel to standardize and create protocols for coping with trauma and resilience-building in a social general society context.
By Rabbi Sandra Cohen | Forgiving myself is always the hardest part. Inside, I feel I failed. But, if I step back, or I step up on the balcony to see the pattern my life has taken, it is hard to realistically to believe I botched my life. Instead, I want to proclaim the wonders of my college years, the things I learned and the faith I discovered. All of these helped to get me to where I am now, with a life full of blessings.
A handy, beautifully designed downloadable card with the text of the Menorah blessings in hebrew and english, along with a short message of mental health to ponder as you light.