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Archives: Resources

What exactly does it mean to be an ally? Is saying you are an ally enough? Are you required to take a more active role in order to be considered someone who supports a particular community? If so, what are you meant to do? How do Jewish Mental Health Values teach us about being an Ally?
Sukkot is known in traditional rabbinic sources as a holiday of joy and gratitude, but what does this holiday look like for someone who can't feel that joy, either because of a chronic condition of a momentary challenge? How can we make our Sukkot places for sharing and love between people?
How does the Sukkah represent an ideal for safety, support, and love? And, how can we bring those lessons into our own lives and make Sukkot-Spaces of peace and safety?
Make Your Own Mental Health Lulav and Esrog! Sukkot, the Jewish harvest holiday of the “huts,” is a week of celebration that starts five days after Yom Kippur. Rabbinic tradition tells us a Sukkah, or temporary structure with at least three sides and a roof of thatch or branches, represents the dwellings the Israelites built  and lived in during their 40 years of wandering in the desert.
As Mental Health Awareness Month draws to a close, I think about my friends’ son who died by suicide a few weeks ago. He was 16. It’s every parent’s worst nightmare, and my heart aches for my friends. This most awful of tragedies continuously haunts me. It’s impossible to imagine that someone who is 16—who has his whole life in front of him—could be in so much pain that he chooses to make such an irreversible decision...